MMaterialsgateNEWS 2017/04/26

Related MaterialsgateCARDS

Construction: Russian scientists create new system of concrete building structures

Credit: Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University

Professor of the Institute of Civil Engineering of Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) Andrey Ponomarev and a graduate student Alexander Rassokhin developed a new construction technology.

Scientists created several types of building blocks based on nanostructured high-strength lightweight concrete, reinforced with skew-angular composite coarse grids. The development has unique characteristics, enabling the increase of load-carrying capability by more than 200% and decrease in specific density of the construction by 80%. In addition, among the advantages, are resistance to corrosion, aggressive environments and excessive frost resistance.

Researchers calculated that the service life of the building structures, made with the use of this reinforcement system, will increase at least 2-3 times in comparison with its modern analogs.

"Such system allows to ensure the structure integrity even in conditions of seismic activity, since the load is distributed throughout the structure as a whole, and not by individual reinforcement bars. The invention can be used in the construction of bridges and pedestrian crossings, non-metallic ships, low-rise residential buildings" says Alexander Rassokhin.

The fundamentals of the research have been described in an article "Hybrid wood-polymer composites in civil engineering" at the Magazine of Civil Engineering.

Source: Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University – 24.04.2017.

Investigated and edited by:

Dr.-Ing. Christoph Konetschny, Inhaber und Gründer von Materialsgate
Büro für Material- und Technologieberatung
The investigation and editing of this document was performed with best care and attention.
For the accuracy, validity, availability and applicability of the given information, we take no liability.
Please discuss the suitability concerning your specific application with the experts of the named company or organization.

You want additional material or technology investigations concerning this subject?

Materialsgate is leading in material consulting and material investigation.
Feel free to use our established consulting services

MMore on this topic

Credit: Multiscale Materials Laboratory/Rice University

Rice University lab's calculations show new mechanisms to induce strength, ductility into concrete

Concrete isn't thought of as a plastic, but plasticity at small scales boosts concrete's utility as the world's most-used material by letting it constantly adjust to stress, decades and sometimes even centuries after hardening. Rice University researchers are a step closer to understanding why. The Rice lab of materials scientist Rouzbeh Shahsavari performed an atom-level computer analysis of tobermorite, a naturally occurring crystalline analog to the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) that makes up cement, which in turn holds concrete together. By understanding the internal structure of tobermorite, they hope to make concrete stronger, tougher and better able to deform without... more read more

Credit: Multiscale Materials Laboratory/Rice University

Rice University scientists develop 'programmable' cement particles to attain enhanced properties

Bringing order to disorder is key to making stronger and greener cement, the paste that binds concrete. Scientists at Rice University have decoded the kinetic properties of cement and developed a way to "program" the microscopic, semicrystalline particles within. The process turns particles from disordered clumps into regimented cubes, spheres and other forms that combine to make the material less porous and more durable. Their study appears in the Royal Society of Chemistry's Journal of Materials Chemistry A. The technique may lead to stronger structures that require less concrete -- and less is better, said Rice materials scientist and lead author Rouzbeh Shahsavari... more read more

Researchers at UCLA have clarified the origins of a mechanism responsible for the gradual deformation of concrete

College students have used it to make cheap furniture, China has had shortages of it, and main character Michael Scott of "The Office" once famously buried his face in it. Concrete is everywhere -- a ubiquity owed to its strength as a building material. Despite its strength, however, it has a pernicious but inescapable tendency to "creep," or deform progressively under mechanical stress, which leads to crumbling bridges and cracked roads. Much like Radiohead's hit song Creep was in 1993 for anyone with an FM radio, the phenomenon of creep is inescapable, at least for material solids. Despite the obvious relevance this holds for the safety of infrastructure, however... more read more

Rice University models detail how defects influence efficiency in concrete manufacture

Because concrete, the world's most-used construction material, is such a major contributor to climate change, it's worth knowing every detail about how it's manufactured, according to Rice University scientists. The Rice lab of theoretical physicist Rouzbeh Shahsavari is looking into those details down to the atomic level. The lab has published the results of computer modeling studies that detail how dislocations - screw-like defects - in raw crystals used for concrete influence how efficiently it can be made. The research published this month in the Journal of the American Ceramic Society shows that tricalcium silicates (C3S) that consist of pure rhombohedral crystals are... more read more

MaterialsgateNEWSLETTER

Partner of the Week

Search in MaterialsgateNEWS

Books and products

MaterialsgateFAIR:
LET YOURSELF BE INSPIRED