Benefits for exhibitors:

Targeted: The MaterialsgateFAIR presents your materials 24/7 at the user´s fingertips

Efficient: Qualified B2B enquiries support your sales department with minimum effort

Clever: MaterialsgateFAIR provides highly measurable results at low costs

How? Contact us, we will develop your tailor-made presentation!

MMaterialsgateFAIR - 100% Materialtransfer

The Materialsgate Online Fair and Experts Platform

Simply Clever: Click exhibits and send requests for further information – your requests will be answered directly by the product specialists of the exhibitors!

Place your virtual exhibit here!

MMaterialsgateNEWS - Information & Innovation

Credit: Photo courtesy of Qi (Kevin) Ge

Heat-responsive materials may aid in controlled drug delivery and solar panel tracking

Engineers from MIT and Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) are using light to print three-dimensional structures that "remember" their original shapes. Even after being stretched, twisted, and bent at extreme angles, the structures -- from small coils and multimaterial flowers, to an inch-tall replica of the Eiffel tower -- sprang back to their original forms within seconds of being heated to a certain temperature "sweet spot." For some structures, the researchers were able to print micron-scale features as small as the diameter of a human hair -- dimensions that are at least one-tenth as big as what others have been able to achieve with printable shape... more read more

Using electricity rather than heat can reduce both energy costs and greenhouse gas emissions

The MIT researchers were trying to develop a new battery, but it didn't work out that way. Instead, thanks to an unexpected finding in their lab tests, what they discovered was a whole new way of producing the metal antimony -- and potentially a new way of smelting other metals, as well. The discovery could lead to metal-production systems that are much less expensive and that virtually eliminate the greenhouse gas emissions associated with most traditional metal smelting. Although antimony itself is not a widely used metal, the same principles may also be applied to producing much more abundant and economically important metals such as copper and nickel, the researchers say. The... more read more

Credit: UMass Amherst

UMass Amherst introduces 'Braidio' technology, lets mobile devices share power

In a paper presented today at the Association for Computing Machinery's special interest group on data communication (SIGCOMM) conference in Florianópolis, Brazil, a team of computer science researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst led by professor Deepak Ganesan introduced a new radio technology that allows small mobile devices to take advantage of battery power in larger devices nearby for communication. Ganesan and his graduate students in the College of Information and Computer Sciences, Pan Hu, Pengyu Zhang and Mohammad Rostami, designed and are testing a prototype radio that could help to extend the life of batteries in small, mass-market mobile devices such as... more read more

Credit: Lori Sanders

Powered by a chemical reaction controlled by microfluidics, 3-D-printed 'octobot' has no electronics

A team of Harvard University researchers with expertise in 3D printing, mechanical engineering, and microfluidics has demonstrated the first autonomous, untethered, entirely soft robot. This small, 3D-printed robot -- nicknamed the octobot -- could pave the way for a new generation of completely soft, autonomous machines. Soft robotics could revolutionize how humans interact with machines. But researchers have struggled to build entirely compliant robots. Electric power and control systems -- such as batteries and circuit boards -- are rigid and until now soft-bodied robots have been either tethered to an off-board system or rigged with hard components. Robert Wood, the Charles River Professor... more read more

Credit: Lehigh University and Anand Jagota

Lehigh-led team collaborating with Michelin Corporation and NSF to develop materials with surface architectures -- inspired by surfaces on feet of grasshoppers or frogs -- that could improve the safety and reliability of tires

The fascination with the ability of geckos to scamper up smooth walls and hang upside down from improbable surfaces has entranced scientists at least as far back as Aristotle, who noted the reptile's remarkable feats in his History of Animals. But it wasn't until about 15 years ago, when researchers were definitively able to attribute the gecko's powers of adhesion to nanoscale threads in the gecko's toes, that the practical possibilities of biomimicry at microscopic levels caught the imagination of researchers in earnest. Now, a Lehigh-led team is collaborating with Michelin Corporation and the National Science Foundation to develop materials with surface architectures... more read more

Credit: William Dichtel, Northwestern University

Nanomaterial combines attributes of both batteries and supercapacitors

A powerful new material developed by Northwestern University chemist William Dichtel and his research team could one day speed up the charging process of electric cars and help increase their driving range. An electric car currently relies on a complex interplay of both batteries and supercapacitors to provide the energy it needs to go places, but that could change. "Our material combines the best of both worlds -- the ability to store large amounts of electrical energy or charge, like a battery, and the ability to charge and discharge rapidly, like a supercapacitor," said Dichtel, a pioneer in the young research field of covalent organic frameworks (COFs). Dichtel and his... more read more

Credit: Xiaodong Chen, Ph.D.

A future of soft robots that wash your dishes or smart T-shirts that power your cell phone may depend on the development of stretchy power sources.

But traditional batteries are thick and rigid — not ideal properties for materials that would be used in tiny malleable devices. In a step toward wearable electronics, a team of researchers has produced a stretchy micro-supercapacitor using ribbons of graphene. The researchers will present their work today at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). ACS, the world’s largest scientific society, is holding the meeting here through Thursday. It features more than 9,000 presentations on a wide range of science topics. “Most power sources, such as phone batteries, are not stretchable. They are very rigid,” says Xiaodong Chen, Ph.D. “My team... more read more

Credit: Julie Russell/LLNL

A team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers has demonstrated the 3D printing of shape-shifting structures that can fold or unfold to reshape themselves when exposed to heat or electricity.

The micro-architected structures were fabricated from a conductive, environmentally responsive polymer ink developed at the Lab. In an article published recently by the journal Scientific Reports (link is external), Lab scientists and engineers revealed a strategy for creating boxes, spirals and spheres from shape memory polymers (SMPs), bio-based "smart" materials that exhibit shape-changes when resistively heated or when exposed to the appropriate temperature. While the approach of using responsive materials in 3D printing, often known as "4D printing," is not new, LLNL researchers are the first to combine the process of 3D printing and subsequent folding (via origami... more read more

Credit: Cockrell School of Engineering

Researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin have invented a new flexible smart window material that, when incorporated into windows, sunroofs, or even curved glass surfaces, will have the ability to control both heat and light from the sun.

Their article about the new material will be published in the September issue of Nature Materials. Delia Milliron, an associate professor in the McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering, and her team's advancement is a new low-temperature process for coating the new smart material on plastic, which makes it easier and cheaper to apply than conventional coatings made directly on the glass itself. The team demonstrated a flexible electrochromic device, which means a small electric charge (about 4 volts) can lighten or darken the material and control the transmission of heat-producing, near-infrared radiation. Such smart windows are aimed at saving on cooling and heating bills for homes... more read more

Credit: Barron Research Group/Rice University

Rice University scientists study efficiency of adsorbents for natural gas sweetening

A careful balance of the ingredients in carbon-capture materials would maximize the sequestration of greenhouse gases while simplifying the processing -- or "sweetening" -- of natural gas, according to researchers at Rice University. The lab of Rice chemist Andrew Barron led a project to map how changes in porous carbon materials and the conditions in which they're synthesized affect carbon capture. They discovered aspects that could save money for industry while improving its products. The research appears this month in the Royal Society of Chemistry's Journal of Materials Chemistry A. The lab compared how characteristics of porous carbon, often manufactured in pellet... more read more

Partner Of The Week

Materialsgate Login

Materialsgate Partners